Search
  • Chen Moore and Associates

SunSentinel Mention

December 11, 2020

Peter Moore, P.E., F.ASCE, ENV SP, LEED AP

President, Chen Moore and Associates

Last week: “Water is the No. 1 issue that we will have to address going forward if we want to allow the state to thrive as it has” was a comment made by Florida Senate President Wilton Simpson last week to the Florida Chamber of Commerce. Cutting across all facets of our economy, the need for infrastructure helps tourism, housing, agriculture and every other industry that is key for Florida’s success. Even in this tough economy, maintaining, or even more so increasing, state and local funding for water issues is critical for short-term and long-term economic health in Florida.

Looking ahead: Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a group of manmade chemicals that have been manufactured and used in a variety of industries around the globe, including in the United States since the 1940s. These chemicals are very persistent in the environment and in the human body – meaning they don’t break down and they can accumulate over time. There is evidence that exposure to PFAS can lead to adverse human health effects. The State of Florida Division of Waste Management has developed a plan for a coordinated approach to these chemicals and every utility around the state is reviewing for compliance to ensure Floridians’ safety.

0 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

SunSentinel Mention

February 19, 2021 Peter Moore, P.E., F.ASCE, ENV SP, LEED AP President, Chen Moore and Associates Last week: If you are like me, you looked at the weather across the country the past week and said, th

SunSentinel Mention

February 19, 2021 Peter Moore, P.E., F.ASCE, ENV SP, LEED AP President, Chen Moore and Associates Last week: If you are like me, you looked at the weather across the country the past week and said, th

SunSentinel Mention

February 12, 2021 Peter Moore, P.E., F.ASCE, ENV SP, LEED AP President, Chen Moore and Associates Last week: Last week, the water supply of Oldsmar, Florida, population 15,000, was briefly in jeopardy